Threnody

Woe of Tyrants  Main Performer

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1 Tetelestai (Intro) Chris Catanzaro/Woe 1:13
2 Creatures of the Mire Chris Catanzaro/Woe 4:00
3 Venom Eye Chris Catanzaro/Woe 4:22
4 Tempting the Wretch Chris Catanzaro/Woe 4:25
5 Threnody Chris Catanzaro/Woe 6:27
6 Bloodsmear Chris Catanzaro/Woe 4:38
7 The Venus Orbit [Instrumental] Chris Catanzaro/Woe 3:33
8 Lightning Over Atlantis Chris Catanzaro/Woe 4:24
9 Singing Surrender Chris Catanzaro/Woe 3:58
10 Descendit Ad Inferos (The Harrowing of Hell) Chris Catanzaro/Woe 3:55
  • Overview
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Threnody

Audio Compact Disc

Label: Metal Blade

Category: Pop/Rock

Threnody

UPC: 039841490220

Release Date: 04/13/2010

Original Release Date: 04/13/2010

Number of Discs: 1

Tracks: [Tetelestai (Intro), Creatures of the Mire, Venom Eye, Tempting the Wretch, Threnody, Bloodsmear, The Venus Orbit [Instrumental], Lightning Over Atlantis, Singing Surrender, Descendit Ad Inferos (The Harrowing of Hell)]
Contributors:

James Christopher Monger

The kings of Chillicothe, OH death metal’s third full-length (and second for Metal Blade) growls, howls, stops, and starts like any good death metal album should. Guitarists Matt Kincaid and Nick Dozer slap down some truly impressive (as in take the listeners to school) riffs and leads in between all of the cacophonous, metalcore-infused math breakdowns and jackhammer crescendos, but Woe of Tyrants' modus operandi is clearly informed by the classics. Threnody’s slick production represents only a slight deviation from 2009’s Kingdom of Might, which should please metal fans with a penchant for the progressive. Every double-kick, dual lead, and orchestral vista is singularly audible, resulting in an odd, sort of clear-headed wave of brutality that works more times than not (think Dark Tranquillity without the reverb). Standout cuts like “Creatures of the Mire,” “Bloodsmear,” and the nearly seven-minute title cut (which skillfully blends vintage Iron Maiden melodies with the sonic assault of Coalesce) feel honed, tarred and feathered. ~ James Christopher Monger, Rovi